Category Archives: back pain

But what if your back pain is extension based

Too many of us are obsessed with  flexion driven back disorders. Which  is fair because most cases of back pain  are flexion based.  However, not all of them are. Some are because you are over extended, and frankly, you need some  careful flexion in your life, and back.

Until I produce a good guide, here are some useful thoughts  from

https://tonygentilcore.com/2014/01/extension-based-back-pain-b/

Piriformis Syndrome

There is a sneaky little muscle in your bum that often makes your back , or legs hurt.

It’s sneaky as, whether or not you have a booty or a skinny ass,  its a muscle that hides underneath the big ( or skinny?) obvious bits.

It creates a lot of mischief. So Voila, the piriformis is the muscle to blame. Its this muscle that I’ll often try and find and “trigger point” if I see you acting  or moving in one of many ways. If you are going to have back pain,  you might as well understand the anatomy

So this is where it lives.

piriformis location

When I’ve found it, here is where I’ll try and press

Piriformis points

I’ll often press or rub each point with my thumb about 10 times. Often I’ll try and teach you how to find these points with a Lacross or massage ball.

Obviously, there are other muscles in this area that I’ll identify and treat, but this is often the cause of a lot of back pain

Well, thats why Ive probably shoved my thumb in your bum!

If you have back pain, do get in contact and I’ll see what I can do to help.

I do a lot of work with the Backaholic programme at Crossfit London in E2 , and I help people cure there back pain. Strangely Im just a massage therapist, but as I teach people to olympic lift,  clamber over objects and do lots of cool  gymnastic stuff, Ive been forced to deal with the bad backs my clients bring to their sessions

Guess what: you practice pain!!!

Its the same with anything, the more you practice, the better you become: perfect practice makes perfect performance.

But, this great secret of super performers (practice, practice, practice,) is the same for those with chronic pain. The better you get at sending pain messages, the more it hurts.

This is great if you are  a masochist, but sucks  a bit  for the rest of us.

“Simply put, pain that persists can become chronic because your neurons become more efficient at transmitting pain signals. The strengthening of connections between neurons through repeated use is called Long Term Potentiation, (LTP).

Dr. Darnall said “The results also underscore the importance of non-pharmacologic psycho-behavioral treatments for chronic pain and also for anxiety,” she added. “When people learn skills to decrease the physiological markers of anxiety or stress, they are simultaneously treating pain.”

Anxiety amplifies pain, so it seems there is  a lot in that tree hugging hippy crap of relaxing and thinking happy thoughts: certainly being negative and depressed does not help your pain

Read another review here

Sit on your Ischial Tuberosities

When sitting, you can sit on your  Coccyx, or your Ischial Tuberosities. After all, it’s your ass!

sit on you ischial tuberosities

BUT…..sitting on your coccyx  ( right picture above: Boo. Bad) is the same as bending over badly and slumping (bad): the abdomen protrudes (bad) , the chest sinks ( bad), and breathing is inhibited. (cannot be good) It also indicates  fatigue (yawn) , and lack of support (Boo). In this position you can  try and make the client  (or yourself) sit up, but it will only last a short time before slumping back (sob) into your Backaholic patterns

Sitting on your Ischial Tuberosities ( a good place to sit, on the left above) , causes a more upright position (good), which elongates the spine (good)  and reduces excessive curvature (good; high five) .  Maintaining  this natural spine is easier as it is seen as a natural position (good. Fist bump). Each minute of wrong sitting can be compared to doing  the wrong exercise. if you sit poorly for 8 hours a day, thats a lot of bad exercise.  you are not a runner or a body builder or a crossfitter, you are a “bad back maker”

Of course, you should never sit  for that long, but if you must sit, sit on your Ischial Tuberosities!!

To get into correct “sit”, once you have sat down, lean to one side (imagine you are  trying to break wind!)  and gently lift your “lifted” buttock up with your hand,  scoop it back then sit down, then do the other side.

This said, you still  have  to fight your slumping habit. You must learn to sit tall and relaxed, but with an appropriate amount of abdominal tone. Say No to being a Backaholic!!

The shoulder bridge: gluteal engagement

Lie on the floor with your knees flexed (feet on the floor) and stick your fingers into the meat of your ass.

Squeeze your ass cheeks together as your method of engaging them  and not by trying to over extend your hips or play with your pelvis; keep that neutral.

Once that is mastered,  bridge the torso off the floor. At this stage, you , a friend or your trainer needs to feel your hamstrings. People who are “hamstring dominant and gluteal deficient will engage the hamstrings prior to moving” (McGill: page 195 Ultimate back Fitness).

This is the wrong pattern. The glutes should drive this action. To help  we can put our foot against your toes, and whilst asking you to squeeze your ass, we  can help your quads engage by lightly cueing from the knees ( so either a finger hook under the knee to gently pull them up, or if you know each other, a quad stroke ( to encourage the hamstrings to switch off) ).

Once you get  your  ass  engaging, “Boom” your back gets  a bit more resilient  and your squat gets better!

shoulder bridge

Help your back find its way: tape it up!

If you struggle to maintain  a neutral spine when deadlifting or squatting, or sitting for that matter, a “bit of gaffer tape” either side of your lumbar spine can give some very useful feedback. Set your neutral back, and get someone to stick tape either side of your spine ( the boney bit in the middle): when you stoop it pulls, and reminds you to maintain a better back position (  but don’t tape into a hyper- lordotic position!!)

backtape1

Obvious point, but make sure you are not allergic to the tape you are going to use! This can really help you save your back and cut down your  pack pain. Essentially it tells the body where your back is. Often back pain sufferer’s have no idea what their back is doing.