But what if your back pain is extension based

Too many of us are obsessed with  flexion driven back disorders. Which  is fair because most cases of back pain  are flexion based.  However, not all of them are. Some are because you are over extended, and frankly, you need some  careful flexion in your life, and back.

Until I produce a good guide, here are some useful thoughts  from

https://tonygentilcore.com/2014/01/extension-based-back-pain-b/

Piriformis Syndrome

There is a sneaky little muscle in your bum that often makes your back , or legs hurt.

It’s sneaky as, whether or not you have a booty or a skinny ass,  its a muscle that hides underneath the big ( or skinny?) obvious bits.

It creates a lot of mischief. So Voila, the piriformis is the muscle to blame. Its this muscle that I’ll often try and find and “trigger point” if I see you acting  or moving in one of many ways. If you are going to have back pain,  you might as well understand the anatomy

So this is where it lives.

piriformis location

When I’ve found it, here is where I’ll try and press

Piriformis points

I’ll often press or rub each point with my thumb about 10 times. Often I’ll try and teach you how to find these points with a Lacross or massage ball.

Obviously, there are other muscles in this area that I’ll identify and treat, but this is often the cause of a lot of back pain

Well, thats why Ive probably shoved my thumb in your bum!

If you have back pain, do get in contact and I’ll see what I can do to help.

I do a lot of work with the Backaholic programme at Crossfit London in E2 , and I help people cure there back pain. Strangely Im just a massage therapist, but as I teach people to olympic lift,  clamber over objects and do lots of cool  gymnastic stuff, Ive been forced to deal with the bad backs my clients bring to their sessions

Is your back pain “psoas Syndrome”

Read more here.

According to the abstract

“Psoas syndrome is an easily missed diagnosis. However, it is important to consider this condition as part of the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with low back pain—particularly for osteopathic physicians, because patients may view these practitioners as experts in musculoskeletal conditions. The authors describe the case of a 48-year-old man with a 6-month history of low back pain that had been attributed to “weak core muscles.” The diagnosis of psoas syndrome was initially overlooked in this patient. After the correct diagnosis was made, he was treated by an osteopathic physician using osteopathic manipulative treatment, in conjunction with at-home stretches between office treatments. At his 1-month follow-up appointment, he demonstrated continued improvement of symptoms and a desire for further osteopathic manipulative treatment.”
Frankly, the stretches recommended in this report are quite standard. The diagnosis of ” weak core” in itself should always be challenged as being too simplistic,  there will almost always be glute, postural,  limb flexibility, manipulation issues to be taken into account